Who is Supposed to See Us?

Yet, I do not apologize for holding steadfastly to the notion that Black and Brown people do not need to bear witness to our skinfolk being murdered in order to truly understand our plight. As much as I want consumers of art to be particular about how they digest pop-cultural and socio-political pieces, I also want artists to think critically about who they want to consume their art. I make this call especially in an age where the pace of production far outpaces the people’s capacity to fully digest and heal from these harrowing news headlines. I fear that we are living in a time in which Black and Brown people are being forced to relive their trauma more than once; we endure the initial pain and shock that accompanies the degradation of justice and then, just a couple years later, we are reminded of our losses through a socio-political film.

Read More

Lessons I Learned from Watching "Knock Down the House"

The film heavily focuses on Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s triumph, so much so that the other three women who ran alongside Ocasio-Cortez seem to be merely footnotes in Ocasio-Cortez’s growing political career. Ocasio-Cortez is framed as the winner of the typical American relay race; the one where countless people build upon their successes and continue to pass along the baton until one person, deemed to be exceptional, crosses the finish line. The film did a great job of highlighting the team that transpired to carry Ocasio-Cortez to the finish line, but if all the women who ran had similar campaigns, stories of struggle and triumph, and arguably the same amount of zeal, why is Ocasio-Cortez the only candidate who won  a Congressional seat?

Read More