Who is Supposed to See Us?

Yet, I do not apologize for holding steadfastly to the notion that Black and Brown people do not need to bear witness to our skinfolk being murdered in order to truly understand our plight. As much as I want consumers of art to be particular about how they digest pop-cultural and socio-political pieces, I also want artists to think critically about who they want to consume their art. I make this call especially in an age where the pace of production far outpaces the people’s capacity to fully digest and heal from these harrowing news headlines. I fear that we are living in a time in which Black and Brown people are being forced to relive their trauma more than once; we endure the initial pain and shock that accompanies the degradation of justice and then, just a couple years later, we are reminded of our losses through a socio-political film.

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Safe Space

I’m learning that most people are only willing to accept the words and work of Black revolutionaries because they seem like a relic of an ancient past; as if racism no longer permeates the elaborately woven threads of this country. Yet to reduce the Black revolutionary to merely words on a page is an injustice and a violent act brought upon yet another Black body. It is disrespectful to their legacy, the risks they’ve taken, and the air they breathed into the movements we’ve inherited. To celebrate a Black revolutionary’s words and work is to know that although racism surely isn’t over, we must celebrate the Black body and mind before it is taken and martyred. ⁣⁣⁣


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